THE NEW CANADIAN MUSEUM FOR HUMAN RIGHTS, MEETING IN HALIFAX


On Sept. 23, 2009 Victor Harris and I,  attended the round table discussions for the new Canadian Museum of Human Rights at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic.

We met in the small craft room. Sail boats all over the place. Wonderful atmosphere.

We were seated at round tables with other guests and a facilitator and note taker.  Our facilitator was the best, Mary Beth. Our note taker was Vander.

We were all welcomed and treated with respect by the organizers.  They wanted our input  for the new museum. Their mandate is to treat people with sensitivity and respect and collect their stories.

As we told our stories at our individual tables and listened to each other’s stories, I realized there was an awful lot of pain and frustration  in this room. These were all brave people who came together with their stories and their concerns to share and contribute to the new museum.  This was a room full of Human Rights Violations.

It was a historical evening. I felt we had all created a little piece of history that night.

Watch for it. You will be impressed.

For more information about the museum, click here.

Connie Brauer

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Canada’s human rights museum crosses country in search of stories


Parents!
Here’s a story in today’s Chronicle Herald. I have signed up to be there and tell our story.
Who else will go? All of us should show up.
Canada’s human rights museum crosses country in search of stories

By MICHAEL LIGHTSTONE Staff Reporter
Fri. Sep 4 – 4:46 AM


Irvine Carvery, president of the Africville Genealogy Society, plans to make a submission to officials from the Canadian Museum for Human Rights during public discussions Sept. 23 in Halifax. (Peter Parsons / Staff)


Irvine Carvery, president of the Africville Genealogy Society, plans to make a submission to officials from the Canadian Museum for Human Rights during public discussions Sept. 23 in Halifax. (Peter Parsons / Staff)

Residential schools forced on native children. Japanese families sent to Second World War-era internment camps. Black citizens resisting racism in their struggle for civil rights.

Gay bashing. Anti-Muslim activity.

The Holocaust.

Survivors of the aforementioned human rights abuses are among the many people in this country who have been victimized by state-sanctioned big-otry or the hateful intolerance of individuals.

This month, Nova Scotians will get their chance to say how they think such societal stains — and others — should be handled by a new national museum being built in Winnipeg.

Officials from the Canadian Museum for Human Rights will be holding a public roundtable Sept. 23 in Halifax and local folks are welcome to participate.

The session aims to collect “human rights stories, perspectives and ideas that can be used to develop the content of the museum,” a website said.

To register for the roundtable, call 1-877-295-6639 or register online at www.humanrightsmuseum.ca/share-your-story.

In Halifax, a submission from the Atlantic Jewish Council will be part of the consultation process, a spokesman said Thursday. The council is affiliated with the Canadian Jewish Congress, which has urged its member agencies to address the content committee when it visits various communities across Canada.

The consultation process began in May and is resuming now after a summer break.

The Canadian Jewish Congress “will be submitting a brief to the museum on the need for a prominent and dedicated Holocaust section in the new museum,” said an email message sent to the Atlantic Jewish Council.

Jon Goldberg, the council’s executive director, told The Chronicle Herald he intends to take part in what has been described as a two-pronged process. He said he’ll attend the public roundtable and a more private “bilateral” discussion with museum officials. Mr. Goldberg said it’s too early to say what exactly his submission will be about, but he acknowledged it’ll promote the historical significance and impact of the Holocaust.

Six million Jews and other Holocaust victims, such as Gypsies, homosexuals, the mentally disabled and political enemies, died during Hitler’s reign, when the Nazis ruled Germany. The start of the war was 70 years ago this month.

A museum spokeswoman said construction began in April and the building is to open in 2012. She said aside from exhibits showcasing the Canadian perspective, there will be international human rights stories “seen through a Canadian lens.”

see the rest of the story at

( mlightstone@herald.ca)

Connie Brauer